The law of non-contradiction new philosophical essays

Brady -- What is a contradiction? Beall, and Bradley P.

The law of non-contradiction new philosophical essays

Three Versions of the Principle of Non-Contradiction There are arguably three versions of the principle of non-contradiction to be found in Aristotle: The first version concerns things that exist in the world, the second is about what we can believe, and the third relates to assertion and truth.

The first version hereafter, simply PNC is usually taken to be the main version of the principle and it runs as follows: The following are some of those qualifications: Also, the thing that belongs must belong actually, and not merely potentially, to its bearer. The second version is as follows: As a descriptive account of human psychology, this may seem implausible.

People surely have inconsistent beliefs; indeed, most of us have many inconsistent beliefs. This is especially true if we take into account the consequences of our beliefs.

These remain difficult issues in modern philosophy of language and epistemology. Can one knowingly believe an outright contradiction?

The law of non-contradiction : new philosophical essays (eBook, ) [benjaminpohle.com]

Heraclitus, for instance, seems to say contradictory things. Here, Aristotle might retort, and he does so retort with respect to Heraclitus, that people can utter such words, but cannot really believe what they are saying Metaph IV 3 b23— An alternate way of understanding the second formulation is to treat it not as a descriptive claim about human psychology, but as a normative claim, a claim about what it is rational to believe.

It is not completely clear how Aristotle understands the second formulation. At the end of Metaphysics IV 3, Aristotle gives a bad argument that the doxastic version rests on the ontological version, confusing belief that not p with not having the belief that p.

There is a further problem with this second formulation. We need to distinguish the possibility of believing that x is F and not F in a particular case from the possibility of disbelieving the first version of PNC in its full generality.

As it stands, this version is neutral about the internal structure of the assertion, but Aristotle assumes that any assertion involves predicating one thing of another. As with the second formulation, one might give a psychologistic interpretation, relating to what people actually do affirm and deny, but the idea that opposite assertions cannot be true at the same time suggests that this third version is better interpreted as a variant of the first formulation.

Which version Aristotle intends to establish is a matter of controversy. He could be establishing the second version on the basis of the first, or the first version on the basis of the second, or just the second version.

It has no specific subject matter, but applies to everything that is.

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It is a first principle and also the firmest principle of all. Like modus ponens, as Lewis Carroll memorably showed, PNC does not function as a premise in any argument. Unlike modus ponens, PNC is not a rule of inference.The Law of Non-Contradiction: New Philosophical Essays by Priest, Graham, J.C.

Beall and Bradley Armour-Garb (eds.) and a great selection of similar Used, . The Law of Non-Contradiction: New Philosophical Essays, edited by Graham Priest, JC Beall, and Bradley Armour-Garb, is dedicated to dialetheism-- the view that some contradictions are true (a state of affairs known as a dialetheia).

Since dialetheism has, in recent years, scrounged its way from. “Laws of Non-Contradiction, Laws of the Excluded Middle and Logics,” pages 73–85, G. Priest, JC Beall, B.

Armour-Garb, The Law of Non-Contradiction; New .

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The Law of Non-Contradiction -- that no contradiction can be true -- has been a seemingly unassailable dogma since the work of Aristotle, in Book G of the Metaphysics.

It is an assumption challenged from a variety of angles in this collection of original papers. The Law of Non-Contradiction: New Philosophical Essays edited by Graham Priest, J. C. Beall, and Bradley Armour-Garb edited by Graham Priest, J.

C.

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Beall, and Bradley Armour-Garb Oxford: . Buy The Law of Non-Contradiction: New Philosophical Essays New Ed by Graham Priest, J. C. Beall, Bradley Armour-Garb (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

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